Before the instant gratification of Facebook, mobile phones, e-mails and even before most people had a telephone hooked up in their homes there was the postcard. Not  just holiday souvenirs, in the first half of the 20th century this classy method of communication was the best way to keep in touch with the day-to-day goings-on of loved ones and to decorate your walls with pretty pictures at the same time. Katerina Vasiliou shares some beautiful Edwardian postcards sent to her great grandmother, exclusively with QueensOfVintage.com

Mrs John Brooks of Bury, Lancashire was my great grandmother. I found these little gems in a box among old photographs, and they have given me a wonderful insight into the style and psyche of the period.

Have a peek at the incredible vintage postcards and their messages over the page.

24th August 1905

“Dear Mrs Brooks
I was glad to hear from you and hope you are all enjoying your holiday. I was also glad to hear that Muriel is no worse. It might have been serious. We are having a lovely time but it was windy yesterday.
M.H.H”

This lovely postcard of dapper young sailors dates back over 100 years. The “Muriel” mentioned is my grandfather’s older sister who must have been a baby at the time. My grandfather wasn’t even born at that point. Extraordinarily, these two women are evidently corresponding whilst both being on holiday. How nice to receive mail over the boarding house breakfast table!

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5 Responses

  1. Lya de Putti

    This is such a charming article! Thanks so much for this. I’m a postcard collector myself and love to try and decipher the handwriting on the back (not always easy). I agree – forget Twitter and send a postcard!

    Reply
  2. Laura

    What a great post.. I enjoyed this very much. I love sending postcards. As I live on the other side of the world from my family and friends I occasionaly write a postcard or letter just so they don’t forget about me 🙂

    Reply
  3. Bruce

    This is such a charming article! Thanks so much for this. I’m a postcard collector myself and love to try and decipher the handwriting on the back (not always easy). I agree – forget Twitter and send a postcard!

    Reply
  4. Rebecka

    Lovely article, and this tradition certainly needs reviving! Though I have to correct your comment on the First World War: Britiain (the last of the warring nations to go to war) declared war on Germany on the 4th August, after Germany’s invasion of Belgium, so by the 12th August postcard war had already arrived.

    Reply

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